Michelle Obama wants to be a 'really fly 90-year-old,' won't run for president

3:05 PM, Aug 15, 2013   |    comments
First lady Michelle Obama walks through the crypt on her way to watch U.S. President Barack Obama be sworn-in for a second term during his public Inauguration ceremony at the U.S. Capitol Building January 21, 2013 in Washington, D.C. The President and first lady were joined by daughters Sasha and Malia. (Photo by Molly Riley-Pool/Getty Images)
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USA TODAY - We all want to live as healthy and long a life as possible, but first lady Michelle Obama also wants to look good doing it.

She spilled about her plans for longevity during an interview with Parade, where the subject of her around-the-corner 50th birthday (Jan. 17) came up.

"I have never felt more confident in myself, more clear on who I am as a woman," she says. "But I am constantly thinking about my own health and making sure that I'm eating right and getting exercise and watching the aches and pains. I want to be this really fly 80-, 90-year old."

She had plenty more to say about her famous bangs, a woman in the White House and those "single mom" comments from this spring.

So, where are the bangs?!: "You know, it's hard to make speeches with hair in your face!"

On the significance of a black first family: "Children born in the last eight years will only know an African-American man being president of the United States. That changes the bar for all of our children, regardless of their race, their sexual orientation, their gender. It expands the scope of opportunity in their minds. And that's where change happens."

High schooler Malia's college of choice is...: "You know, I am really trying to tone that way down. Because kids are under unreasonable pressure, and it can destroy a high school experience."

On referring to herself as a 'single mother' in April: "When you have a husband or a partner who's either traveling for work or has huge responsibility ... and I give my husband credit - he knows who their friends are, he knows what their schedule is. But he's not making the calls to the dance studio to figure out what classes they're taking next year. ... I think it's important for both parents to shoulder that [responsibility]. I tell my kids, 'I am thinking about you every other minute of my day.' "

Thoughts on a future female president: "Yes, I think the country is ready for it. It's just a question of who's the best person out there."

USA Today

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